Communications

The ability to communicate effectively with the public and public officials is essential to the work you do as a nonprofit river group. So, what works and what doesn't? These resources will help you navigate the muddy waters of communication!

Basics

Updated Resources

 

Basics

Water Communication Basics

  • The EPA has a great toolbox for communicating with the public about nonpoint source pollution.  And even though it focuses on NPSP, it's useful for all kinds of things you do!
     
  • Former Hollywood screenwriter Andy Goodman started a nonprofit called The Goodman Center to help nonprofits get their message across to the public through storytelling through ads, presentations, publications--you name it! Check out the Goodman Center:  take a look at their huge library of free communications resources.  Their workshops are also excellent.
  • Smart Chart 3.0: Communications campaign planning is rarely an easy process. If the budget isn't too small, the deadline is too tight - and even on those rare occasions when both time and money are in sufficient supply, you still must answer some daunting questions. Who is your primary target audience? How do they see this issue, and how will you reach them with your message?
     
    In the heat of such planning, many good causes make a common mistake. "The tendency is always to start with tactics and work backwards from there," says Kristen Grimm, President of Spitfire Strategies. So, to help nonprofits and foundations stay focused, Spitfire Strategies created the Smart Chart in 2003.
     
    Ten years down the road, Smart Chart 3.0 remains a powerful planning tool, whether you're simply writing a press release or planning an elaborate multimedia campaign. And best of all, it's free!

  • Water Words that Work is a great resource for watershed communications. Water Words that Work helps nature protection and pollution control organizations professionalize and modernize their communications. They can consult with you about fundraising, advocacy, or pollution prevention campaign OR you can peruse their website to learn more about the Water Words that Work Communications Method.  Eric Eckl who started Water Words that Work came to the Georgia River Network Conference in 2009 to talk about communications.  Watch and learn from the videos below!

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

 

Communications Articles We Found Helpful

Updated Resources